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Hard to believe I won 2 Slams in 2-and-a-half months. Del Potro 'never gave up' quest to return to US Open final. Often, a 7-point tie-breaker is played when the set score is tied at to determine who wins the set. The score of games within a set is counted in the ordinary manner, except when a player or team has a score of no games it is read as "love".

The score is written using digits separated by a dash. This score is announced by the judge or server at the start of each game. In doubles, service alternates between the teams. One player serves for an entire service game, with that player's partner serving for the entirety of the team's next service game. Players of the receiving team receive the serve on alternating points, with each player of the receiving team declaring which side of the court deuce or ad side they will receive serve on for the duration of the set.

Advantage sets have a tendency to go significantly longer than tie-break sets. The Wimbledon first-round match between John Isner and Nicolas Mahut , which is the longest professional tennis match in history, notably ended with Isner winning the fifth set, 70— The match lasted in total 11 hours and five minutes with the fifth set alone lasting eight hours, 11 minutes.

Nevertheless, even tie-break sets can last a long time. For instance, once players reach 6—6 set score and also reach 6—6 tiebreaker score, play must continue until one player has a 2-point advantage, which can take a considerable time.

Sets decided by tiebreakers, however, are typically significantly shorter than extended advantage sets. The set is won by the first player or team to have won at least six games and at least two games more than his or her opponent.

Traditionally, sets would be played until both these criteria had been met, with no maximum number of games. To shorten matches, James Van Alen created a tie-breaker system, which was widely introduced in the early s. If the score reaches 6—5 or , one further game is played. If the leading player wins this game, the set is won 7—5 or If the trailing player wins the game, the score is tied at 6—6 and a special tiebreaker game is played.

The winner of the tiebreak wins the set by a score of 7—6 or The tiebreak is sometimes not employed for the final set of a match and an advantage set is used instead.

Therefore, the deciding set must be played until one player or team has won two more games than the opponent. This is true in three of the four major tennis championships, all except the US Open where a tiebreak is played even in the deciding set fifth set for the men, third set for the women at 6—6.

A tiebreak is not played in the deciding set in the other three majors — the Australian Open , the French Open , and Wimbledon. When the tiebreak was first introduced at Wimbledon in , it was invoked at 8—8 rather than 6—6.

The US Open formerly held "Super Saturday" where the two men's semi-finals were played along with the women's final on the second Saturday of the event; therefore a tie-break was more prudent where player rest and scheduling is more important. At a score of 6—6, a set is often determined by one more game called a "twelve point tiebreaker". Only one more game is played to determine the winner of the set; the score of the set is always 7—6 or 6—7.

Points are counted using ordinary numbering. The set is decided by the player who wins at least seven points in the tiebreak but also has two points more than his or her opponent. For example, if the score is 6 points to 5 points and the player with 6 points wins the next point, he or she wins the tiebreak and the set.

If the player with 5 points wins the point, the tiebreak continues and cannot be won on the next point, since no player will be two points better. In the scoring of the set, sometimes the tiebreak points are included as well as the game count, for example 7—6 7—5.

Another way of listing the score of the tiebreak is to list only the loser's points. For example, if the set score is listed as 7—6 8 , the tiebreak score was 10—8 since 8 is the loser's points, and the winner must win by two points. Similarly, 7—6 3 means the tiebreak score was 7—3. The player who would normally be serving after 6—6 is the one to serve first in the tiebreak, and the tiebreak is considered a service game for this player.

The server begins his or her service from the deuce court and serves one point. After the first point, the serve changes to the first server's opponent. Each player then serves two consecutive points for the remainder of the tiebreak. The first of each two-point sequence starts from the server's advantage court and the second starts from the deuce court. In this way, the sum of the scores is even when the server serves from the deuce court.

After every six points, the players switch ends of the court; note that the side-changes during the tiebreak will occur in the middle of a server's two-point sequence. At the end of the tiebreak, the players switch ends of the court again, since the set score is always odd 13 games.

Scoring is the same, but end changes take place after the first point and then after every four points. This approach allows the servers of doubles teams to continue serving from the same end of the court as during the body of the set. It also reduces the advantage the elements e.

The tiebreaker — more recently shortened to just "tiebreak", though both terms are still used interchangeably — was invented by James Van Alen and unveiled in as an experiment at the pro tournament he sponsored at Newport Casino, Rhode Island, [19] after an earlier, unsuccessful attempt to speed up the game by the use of his so-called "Van Alen Streamlined Scoring System" "VASSS".

The scoring was the same as that in table tennis , with sets played to 21 points and players alternating five services, with no second service.

The rules were created partially to limit the effectiveness of the powerful service of the reigning professional champion, Pancho Gonzales. Even with the new rules, however, Gonzales beat Pancho Segura in the finals of both tournaments. Even though the match went to 5 sets, with Gonzales barely holding on to win the last one 21—19, it is reported to have taken 47 minutes to complete.

Van Alen called his innovation a "tiebreaker", and he actually proposed two different kinds or versions of it: Apart from being used for 5 years at US Open it was also used 1 year at Wimbledon and for a while on the Virginia Slims circuit and in American Colleges. The other type of tiebreaker Van Alen introduced is the "point" tiebreaker that is most familiar and widely used today. Because it ends as soon as either player or team reaches 7 points — provided that that player or team leads the other at that point by at least two points — it can actually be over in as few as 7 points.

However, because the winning player or team must win by a margin of at least two points, a "point" tiebreaker may go beyond 12 points — sometimes well beyond. That is why Van Alen derisively likened it to a "lingering death", in contrast to the 9-point or fewer "sudden-death tiebreaker" that he recommended and preferred. The impetus to use some kind of a tie-breaking procedure gained force after a monumental struggle at Wimbledon between Pancho Gonzales and Charlie Pasarell.

This was a 5-set match that lasted five hours and 12 minutes and took 2 days to complete. In the fifth set the year-old Gonzales won all seven match points that Pasarell had against him, twice coming back from 0—40 deficits. The final score was 22—24, 1—6, 16—14, 6—3, 11—9 for Gonzales. In , the nine-point tiebreaker was introduced at Wimbledon the first scoring change at Wimbledon in 94 years.

In , Wimbledon put into effect a point tiebreaker when the score in a set reached 8—8 in games unless the set was one in which one of the players could achieve a match victory by winning it. In , Wimbledon changed their rules so that a point tiebreak would be played once any set except the final set reached 6—6 in games. In , the Davis Cup adopted the tie-break in all sets except for the final set, and then extended it to the final set starting in In , the Australian Open replaced the deciding third set of mixed doubles with an eighteen-point "match tiebreak" first to ten points and win by two points wins the match.

Wimbledon continues to play a traditional best of three match, requiring an advantage set for the third set. Tie-break sets are now nearly universal in all levels of play, for all sets in a match; however, the tie-break is not a compulsory element in any set, and the actual formatting of sets and tie-breaks depends on the tournament director in tournaments, and, in private matches, on the players' agreement before play begins.

Tie-breaks are not used in the final set in the Australian Open for singles, the French Open for singles, Wimbledon , or the Fed Cup , nor were they used for final sets in Davis Cup play or the Olympics before The US Open now uses a tiebreak in the final set, both in singles and in doubles, and is the only major tournament to use a tiebreak in the final set for singles.

However, the Australian Open and French Open do now use a final set tiebreak in both men's and women's doubles. While traditional sets continue until a player wins at least six games by a margin of at least two games there are some alternative set scoring formats in use. A common alternative set format is the eight or nine game pro set. Instead of playing until one player reaches six games with a margin of two games, one plays until one player wins eight or nine games with a margin of two games.

A tie-break is then played at eight or nine games all. While the format is not used in modern professional matches or recognized by the ITF rules, it was supposedly used in early professional tours.

It is commonly utilized in various amateur leagues and high school tennis as a shorter alternative to a best of three match, but longer than a traditional tie-break set. In addition, eight game pro sets were used during doubles for all Division I college dual matches, until the season. Another alternative set format are so called "short sets" where the first to four games to win by two games.

In this format a tie-break is played at four games all. The ITF experimented with this format in low level Davis Cup matches, but the experiment was not continued. Nevertheless, this alternative remains as an acceptable alternative in the ITF rules of Tennis. Another alternative set format is seen in World Team Tennis where the winner of a set is the first to win five games and a nine-point tie-break is played at 4—4. Most singles matches consist of an odd number of sets, the match winner being the player who wins more than half of the sets.

The match ends as soon as this winning condition is met. Men's singles and doubles matches may consist of up to five sets the winner being the first to take the majority of total allocated sets while women's singles matches are usually best of three sets. Women's doubles matches as well as mixed doubles are usually best of three sets, with a Super TieBreak to ten points played if the score reaches a set all. While the alternation of service between games continues throughout the match without regard to sets, the ends are changed after each odd game within a set including the last game.

If, for example, the second set of a match ends with the score at 6—3, 1—6, the ends are changed as the last game played was the 7th odd game of the set and in spite of it being the 16th even game of the match. Notably, in situations where a set ends with an odd game, back to back games see change of ends—i. A tiebreaker game is treated as a single game for the purposes of this alternation. Since tiebreakers always result in a score of 7—6, there is always a court change after the tiebreaker.

The score of a complete match may be given simply by sets won, or with the scores of each set given separately. In either case, the match winner's score is stated first. In the former, shorter form, a match might be listed as 3—1 i. In the latter form, this same match might be further described as "7—5, 6—7 4—7 , 6—4, 7—6 8—6 ".

As noted above, an alternate form of writing the tiebreak score lists only the loser's score—e. This match was won three sets to one, with the match loser winning the second set on a tiebreaker. The numbers in parentheses, normally included in printed scorelines but omitted when spoken, indicate the duration of the tiebreaker following a given set. Here, the match winner lost the second-set tiebreaker 7—4 and won the fourth-set tiebreaker 8—6. Consider a player who wins six games in each of two sets, all by a score of game— Suppose also that the loser wins four games in each set, all by a score of game-love.

The final score is a win by 6—4, 6—4; total points 48— An example of this in actual practice was the record-breaking Isner-Mahut match in the Wimbledon first round, 22—24 June American John Isner beat Nicolas Mahut of France 6—4, 3—6, 6—7 7—9 , 7—6 7—3 , 70—68 — Mahut winning a total of points to Isner's Likewise, a player may lose a match despite winning the majority of games played or win a match despite losing the majority of games.

Roger Federer won the Wimbledon final over Andy Roddick 5—7, 7—6 8—6 , 7—6 7—5 , 3—6, 16—14 despite Roddick's winning more games 39, versus Federer's When playing a match, it is usually best to report each score out loud with one's opponent to avoid conflicts. During a game, the server has the responsibility to announce the game score before serving. This is done by announcing the server's score first.

If, for example, the server loses the first three points of his or her service game, he or she would say "love—40". This is to be done every time. After a set is complete, the server, before serving for the first game of the next set, announces the set scores so far completed in the match, stating his or her own scores first. If the server has won the first two sets and is beginning the third, he or she would say, "two—love, new set. As an example, consider a match between Victoria Azarenka and Ana Ivanovic.